The finished product!

August 2, 2008

Thank you to our stellar clients and a dedicated design and construction team!

The Design Team:  Matt Ulrich: Matthew Ulrich Landscape Design, Lisa Kawski: lmk interiors, ltd., and Juli MacDonald: GreenBridge Architects (see links in sidebar!)

Landscaping and Spring!

April 28, 2008

Rain Garden and Court Installation

 

Under Matt Ulrich of Matthew Ulrich Landscape Design’s direction, the landscape installation has been taking beautiful shape.  The larger part of the brick patio is being constructed reusing brick from the existing site.  All other masonry stone was selected from a local stone yard less than a half mile away.

In the foreground, the perimeter of the rain garden can be seen.  Both site surface and subsurface water will be diverted here, and the rain garden will soon be planted with native perennials which will attract birds and butterflies.  The plantings will be able to tolerate wet conditions, but will also be drought tolerant, requiring no additional watering.  The rain garden will treat the water and allow it to drain slowly back into the water table, reducing the addition of contaminants to nearby Pentucket Pond.

Walk Construction at Entry

Used granite curbing recycled from a public works project in Lawrence was used for the granite steps leading to the new entry.    Parking court

Installation of the parking court is underway.  A large slab of granite was split and is being used as entry pillars for the court.

Parking Court Construction

Installation of parking court and brick walkway.  Beyond, the house is ready for final stucco patching and paint. 

 Retaining Wall

Found beach rock at the base of the stone retaining wall allows water to penetrate to a drain below.

A welcoming entry

February 11, 2008

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While interior rough-ins and insulation work are underway, Meadowview built and installed the new GreenBridge-designed entry overhang, which offers a welcoming and protected entry.

Moving Along!

January 11, 2008

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The slab has been poured and the addition is taking shape.

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Rigid insulation is on the inside of the foundation under the windows.

  

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Marie Klien from Samarra Studios paints over the newly insulated Great Room ceiling and exposed beams using Benjamin Moore’s Aura, low VOC paint.

Insulation and heating

January 5, 2008

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Tubing installed for the in-slab radiant heating system over metal slab reinforcement and reflective 2″ rigid insulation.  Radiant heat is more efficient than baseboard heating because the boiler heats circulating water to a lower temperature, the heat is dispersed throughout the space and not just the perimeter, and the floor material (concrete here) stores the heat better than air.

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2″ of rigid insulation added between the structural beams in the Great Room.  Mike Brown estimates that this increase of R-value by 10 will save $150 in heating costs annually.

interior-kitchen.jpgThis picture is facing what will be the new laundry room – (It’s going to be STUNNING!  Really!) The slab has been removed to allow for new under-slab insulation and heat.  Rough plumbing is in place for the washer and dryer – the yellow pipe is the propane line.  The cats (not seen in the picture) are eagerly waiting for the installation of their new fully-insulated cat door….

  roof-pitch.jpgMeadowview has installed the end rafter so we can now see the roof pitch for the new addition.  We have taken care to keep the roof an adequate distance from the existing window sills.  The new roof will be copper that will naturally ‘patina’ in place.

lumber-stamp.jpgDetail of the lumber stamp – all the wood for the project is FSC certified and is being purchased from Sterritt Lumber Supply- Sterritt is one of the few local yards carrying FSC certified lumber and other sustainable and recycled products.  This lumber is from Pleasant River in Maine – part of our goal of buying green and local - with the added bonus of seeing our flag on each piece of lumber!

Demoliton and Foundation

November 22, 2007

fndtn.jpgFoundation installed at the location of the new bay, which will be large enough for an eating area and a comfortable chair with a side table.  The surveying equipment is being used to determine existing and new slopes of the ground adjacent to the building to avoid ponding and freezing near the house.  Matthew Ulrich Landscape Design is working on a patio plan that may include a rain garden to take advantage of excess water at this location.

fndtn-detail.jpgFoundation detail showing rigid insulation, sill seal under the ‘sill’ wood plate and connection with old foundation.  The new floor slab will be on top of 2″ rigid insulation and will sit on the concrete ‘shelf’.  The taller part of the foundation protects the interior from the high ground on the outside.  Our client agreed to the added value option of removing the existing concrete slab in the kitchen (old garage) for the installation of a new concrete slab with insulation and radiant heat throughout. 

center-post-north-wall.jpgGreat example of the mysteries uncovered during demolition – this structure is at the center of what will be the new bay.  We learned that the existing opening at what used to be garage doors, is being held up by a large concrete beam.  Structural engineers Ross Engineering worked hard to quickly engineer a beam and connection detail to allow removal of this post.

During this team meeting, lmk interiors, ltd. reviewed the interior finish selections and equipment that have so far been selected with the client.  These selections include Energy  Star labeled appliances, water-saving plumbing fixtures, American Clay wall finishes, concrete or recycled product countertops, Terra Green recycled floor and wall tiles and cabinetry built with FSC certified lumber.

Advance Building Analysis’ report and findings were reviewed.  The report gives suggested energy-saving modifications and annual expected cost-savings for each for a combined possible energy savings of $2700 per year!!Meadowview Construction will determine their costs to complete the energy-saving modifications to the home, with hopes of incorporating these changes into the work. 

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